How to Fix ” Bash Sudo Command Not Found”

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How to Fix ” Bash Sudo Command Not Found” | Easy Tech Tricks

We’ll teach you how to fix the Sudo command not found on Debian 10 VPS in this article. Sudo is a Unix-like computer operating system software that allows users to run programs with the security rights of another user, in this case, the superuser.

It can stand for “superuser do” because that was all it did at first. Still, now it might also stand for “substitute user, do” because Sudo can run commands like other users.

The Sudo command could not be used to perform privileged tasks after a fresh Debian 10 installation. Therefore, the errors not found in Debian 10′ will appear.

Sudo, commonly known as “superuser do,” is a Linux command that allows you to run root-level administrative commands. For example, it prompts you for your password and verifies your requests by looking through a sudoers file.

How to fix Debian 10 Sudo command not found

The Sudo command could not be used to perform privileged tasks after a fresh Debian 10 installation. Therefore, the errors not found in Debian 10′ will appear. The Sudo command isn’t included by default in Debian 10, which is why this issue occurs.

We’ll teach you how to fix the Sudo command not found on Debian 10 VPS in this post.

Prerequisites

  • A brand new Debian 10 VPS.
  • The root user account can be accessed.

Check for Sudo Error

To begin, use the SSH command to log into your Debian 10 VPS as the root user:

root@your-server-ip ssh

To check the sudo error, use the following command after logging in:

apt-get update Sudo

The following error should appear:

sudo: command not found -bash

The Sudo command must be installed.

The sudo package is installed by default in the Debian 10 default repository. However, you can use the apt-get command to install it, as demonstrated below:

Sudo apt-get install

The program above will create a /etc/sudoers file and install the Sudo command.

In the Sudo Group, add a new user. After installing the Sudo package, you must create a new ordinary user and add it to the sudo group.

To begin, use the following command to create a new user:

user1 is added as a user.

Output: 

After that, join the sudo group using your newly formed user:

sudo user1 usermod -aG

This command will give the user1 sudo access, allowing it to use the Sudo command to perform administrative tasks. Next, use the following command to see if the user has been added to the sudo group:

User1’s ID

You’ll notice that user1 is a member of two groups: user1 and sudo.

uid=1000(user1) gid=1000(user1) groups=1000(user1),27(sudo)

Now change the user to user1 and use sudo to run any command:

Of course, suppose you use one of our Managed VPS Hosting services. In that case, you can ask one of our skilled Linux administrators to install and fix the sudo problem on your Debian 10 VPS for you. They are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and will respond to your request right away.

The Sudo command is used to run commands as a different user. This is most commonly used to execute commands as root. As a result, we may receive an error such as -bash:sudo: command not found, indicating that sudo is not installed. This tutorial will look at various approaches and distributions for solving this problem.

Before we go into how to solve sudo commands that aren’t found in Debian, let’s define Sudo. Sudo refers to the superuser, and a superuser has all of the privileges that a root user has. Ubuntu, Fedora, and Mageia are examples of Linux distributions. 

Similarly, Debian is a general-purpose Linux distribution. Ubuntu is a beginner’s distribution, whereas Debian is a more advanced distribution used by experts. We occasionally encountered an error when working on Debian using the “sudo” command. It could be something along the lines of “Sudo command not found,” “[user name] is not in the sudoers list,” or some other similar problem.

Sudo for Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, and Kali

With the following command, we may install Sudo for Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, and Kali-related distributions for deb or apt. However, because package installation requires root rights, we must first be root users.

With the following command, we may install Sudo for rpm or yum in CentOS, Fedora, and RHEL-related systems. However, because package installation requires root rights, we must first be root users.

The Sudo command allows you to change your root user quickly. This is accomplished by a configuration file called sudoers, located at /etc/sudoers. The sudoers file lists users and their ability to run Sudo commands. Most distributions add users to this file automatically. However, this may fail in rare instances. To allow a user to run sudo, we can add the following line. We’ll use the user name Ismail in this example.

If we need to change users other than root while using sudo, we must supply the user name after the Sudo command.

Conclusion

Sudo is used for commands that alter the root folder and other administrative functions. These permissions are only given to the root user or users allowed by the root user for security reasons. In this article, we addressed how to resolve the problem by manually installing sudo (if it is not already installed, use this command to install it; otherwise, it is installed by default in Debian) and adding the user to the list of sudoers by moving to the administrative user account. 

In this write-up, I attempted to help you with the answer to “Sudo command not found,” and I hope that this will assist you in fixing the issue.